The Newsroom

Our Co-op

Our Blog (The Newsroom)

Do you risk losing out on family connections, learning, running your business and shopping and entertainment opportunities because you don't have reliable electricity or broadband services? Live life to its fullest with safe, reliable and affordable electricity and fiber-fast internet, TV and phone services. You matter! We serve homes, farms, churches, schools and small and large commercial businesses to make people's lives better. Thank you for your interest in the cooperative's actions to make people's lives better. The Newsroom will keep you informed.

On Behalf of Team SEMO - Thank you! 

CEO Sean

CEO/GM Sean Vanslyke

Smartphone: (573) 703-7694

March's Rural Missouri

Our Co-op

The March edition of Our Co-op is on its way in the Rural Missouri! If you haven't received yours yet, you can find it here: https://www.nxtbook.com/.../ruralmiss.../202103/index.php... Check out these member spotlights: Pa Pa's Jerky C & C Motorsports & Racing Worthington Ag Parts and Hope International.

 

Arctic Air - Energy Bills

Arctic air descended into the region on February 7 and didn't let up until the afternoon on February 20. The duration of this cold air outbreak was impressive for a large chunk of the country including our area. Paducah, KY set an all-time record with 9 consecutive days remaining below 30 degrees (previous record was 7 days in 1978). Carbondale, IL tied an all-time record with 13 consecutive days remaining below 32 degrees (also set in 1978). Numerous record lows and cold highs were established at Paducah, Carbondale, Cape Girardeau, and Poplar Bluff.

Two snowstorms and an ice storm impacted the region during this time. First came the ice storm on February 10-11, then snowstorm #1 on February 15, and finally snowstorm #2 on February 17-18. By the morning of the 18th, much of the region had picked up between 4 and 12 inches of snow between the two snowstorms. Paducah observed 5 consecutive days with measurable snow, which tied the all-time record (set back in March 1960). This helped achieve the 3rd snowiest February on record for the city with 12.2". Aided by a fresh deep snowpack, overnight lows plummeted below zero in many locations on the mornings of February 16 and 19. 

Another impressive feat was the duration of dangerously cold wind chills observed February 14-16. Paducah went 54 straight hours with a wind chill at or below 5 degrees. Wind chills of this magnitude for that duration hadn't been observed since 1985 in Paducah. It was close to breaking the record for longest duration with wind chills at or below 5 degrees which was 58 hours set in 1962. In Cape Girardeau, they observed 60 consecutive hours with wind chills below 0. This shattered the all-time record which was 46 straight hours set in 1985. Wind chill data goes back to 1972 in Cape Girardeau. In Carbondale, they observed a record-shattering 86 consecutive hours with wind chills below 0. The previous record was 22 hours on New Years Day 2018. Wind Chill data goes back to 1973 in Carbondale.

Member Spotlight: Shady Oak Market

This week’s shout out is located between Advance and Bloomfield on Highway 25. Shady Oak Market is definitely a store you want to check out. They have a variety of deli meats, homemade breads and delicious desserts. Along with their food items, they also have home decor, small gift items, toys and so much more. They would love for you to stop by and see them or give them a call at (573) 321-0861.

Peak Alert - All Clear

5 p.m. Peak Alert - All Clear! Thank you for your patience and understanding throughout the winter storm! Due in part to member efforts to conserve electricity, your electric cooperative system was able to navigate through several record-setting days without the need for controlled service interruptions (or rolling blackouts). We are pleased to share that Associated Electric Cooperative and M & A Electric Power Cooperative, our power suppliers, have now lifted the request to conserve electricity. While we hope these or similar circumstances are not repeated, we are grateful our co-op members are willing to work with us for the best possible outcome during challenging times. Your efforts made a difference! Although we are no longer urging electric conservation for system reliability, you may want to voluntarily continue conservation and energy efficiency measures to help reduce the extreme weather impacts on your upcoming electric bills.

10 a.m. It's difficult to have GoSEMO Fiber without electricity. The same thing rings true for Team SEMO. The electric side is helping reopen the fiber offices by removing snow. Fiber construction has lost at least a week due to ice and snow. We will continue to push forward as we know there are many people who can't wait for GoSEMO Fiber to be installed. We are close to 6,000 subscribers since we connected our first subscriber in February 2018. Thank you for your patience and support!

7:30 a.m. The Friday Feature with Sean. You can’t always have “it” right now, but you can help yourself by showing up early. Sean’s Six Universal Tips for Success: 1) Smile 2) Be Early... see you next week for number three. Prayers for our family and friends struggling in Texas!

 

Continue to Conserve

5:30 p.m. Temperatures will drop tonight so we need to stay focused and pray we get through tomorrow morning without any Midwest grid issues. During the past few days, a reduction in energy usage by members and a strong electric cooperative system have enabled us to avoid implementing any forced outages amid sustained extreme temperatures. Prayers our friends and family members without power in Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oregon and Texas. https://poweroutage.us/

Winter Storm

7 a.m. Be safe driving this morning. Let’s stay positive and continue to conserve energy. Here is a link to see power outages in the United States. There are nearly one million without power. https://poweroutage.us/

Peak Alert Update

4 p.m. We are still playing defense with the power grid, but we are close to being “out of the woods.” Other areas aren’t so blessed. Associated is doing a great job balancing its spinning plates. Here is a link to see power outages in the United States. There are still millions without power. One member of Team SEMO has a son in Houston without power. It is a mess in other states. https://poweroutage.us/

7 a.m. We continue to monitor the load to avoid rolling blackouts. We are prepared should an event occur to the electric grid this morning. We expect a peak between 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Please continue to reduce your electrical usage if possible. The good news is you are saving money by saving energy. Thank you.

Will we lose power?

At this point there is no time frame set for rolling blackouts to begin or if they will happen at all for SEMO Electric. The messages during the past few days have been an effort to help you reduce bill shock and help reduce pressure on the electrical system. If it does get to the point rolling blackouts need to be implemented, we will provide notice as soon as we have been informed. The size of the blackout area will depend on how much system load needs to be shed.

Why is it called a rolling blackout?

It is called a rolling blackout for a reason. The goal is to reduce load by impacting a minimal amount of the system for a designated amount of time and then returning power to the affected area and moving to a different area of the system. The way this will be accomplished on our systems will be by deenergizing the entire substation and not just picking and choosing among individual members. The outage should last no longer than an hour and then the substation will be re-energized and another substation in the system will be turned off.

Why is it happening?

Unfortunately, there is no simple answer for this situation other than an extreme amount of cold weather affecting a large region of the country at one time. One more thing to keep in mind is that the electrical grid is very complex and involves many parts and the aforementioned cold weather is affecting multiples of these parts at one time.

When?

As stated earlier there has been no directive to shed load at this time, so we are only providing this information to be proactive. Rest assured that if the plan has to be put into motion, we will post the notification here and, on our website, as soon as possible. We will do everything in our power to minimize the event to the best of our ability.

What can I do?

Please continue to be safe and save energy when possible. Thank you for your continued support. The employees (Team SEMO) of SEMO Electric Cooperative, M&A Electric Power Cooperative and Associated Electric Cooperative take pride in providing safe and reliable energy to you, the member. Together, with all of us doing our part, we will make it through this event just like we have in the past.

Rolling Blackouts

5:45 p.m. With warming temperatures, the Midwest’s electric grid is in better shape despite frozen wind turbines and limited natural gas supplies. Although this unprecedented winter weather event is not over, we continue to monitor the situation closely and members will be notified as soon as possible if rolling blackouts are necessary. We ask members to continue safely conserving as much electricity as possible as we work through this weather event. The quick action of members over the last 24 hours to reduce loads and conserve electricity has prevented system outages and is greatly appreciated. Team SEMO will arrive early Wednesday should we need to take action to keep the lights on and the fiber following. Be safe. https://www.kfvs12.com/2021/02/16/heartland-electric-co-ops-warn-customer-possible-rolling-blackouts/

Noon: What a beautiful sunny Tuesday! If it would just get about 65-70 degrees warmer that would be perfect. Thank you for your patience, understanding and participation over the last few days. The rolling blackouts for today have been canceled unless there is a generation plant that has issues in the Midwest. There is a chance again tomorrow morning for rolling blackouts. Please continue to monitor your electrical usage and try to reduce if at all possible. Thank you.

7 a.m. At this time, it is possible we will have to shed load in the next few hours as load is rising. We don't know for sure as things are changing minute by minute. The first substation would be Frisco. The blackout will last less than one hour. The next few hours reman critical for the energy grid to avoid more rolling blackouts. Please reduce energy use.

Will we lose power?

At this point there is no time frame set for rolling blackouts to begin or if they will happen at all for SEMO Electric. The messages during the past few days have been an effort to help you reduce bill shock and help reduce pressure on the electrical system. If it does get to the point rolling blackouts need to be implemented, we will provide notice as soon as we have been informed. The size of the blackout area will depend on how much system load needs to be shed.

Why is it called a rolling blackout?

It is called a rolling blackout for a reason. The goal is to reduce load by impacting a minimal amount of the system for a designated amount of time and then returning power to the affected area and moving to a different area of the system. The way this will be accomplished on our systems will be by deenergizing the entire substation and not just picking and choosing among individual members. The outage should last no longer than an hour and then the substation will be re-energized and another substation in the system will be turned off.

Why is it happening?

Unfortunately, there is no simple answer for this situation other than an extreme amount of cold weather affecting a large region of the country at one time. One more thing to keep in mind is that the electrical grid is very complex and involves many parts and the aforementioned cold weather is affecting multiples of these parts at one time.

When?

As stated earlier there has been no directive to shed load at this time, so we are only providing this information to be proactive. Rest assured that if the plan has to be put into motion, we will post the notification here and, on our website, as soon as possible. We will do everything in our power to minimize the event to the best of our ability.

What can I do?

Please continue to be safe and save energy when possible. Thank you for your continued support. The employees (Team SEMO) of SEMO Electric Cooperative, M&A Electric Power Cooperative and Associated Electric Cooperative take pride in providing safe and reliable energy to you, the member. Together, with all of us doing our part, we will make it through this event just like we have in the past.

News story from Kansas City: https://www.kmbc.com/.../level-3-energy.../35514525

Cold Weather Continues

10:30 a.m. The next 12 hours are critical for the energy grid to avoid more rolling blackouts.

Will we lose power?

At this point there is no time frame set for rolling blackouts to begin or if they will happen at all for SEMO Electric. The messages during the past few days have been an effort to help you reduce bill shock and help reduce pressure on the electrical system. If it does get to the point rolling blackouts need to be implemented, we will provide notice as soon as we have been informed. The size of the blackout area will depend on how much system load needs to be shed.

Why is it called a rolling blackout?

It is called a rolling blackout for a reason. The goal is to reduce load by impacting a minimal amount of the system for a designated amount of time and then returning power to the affected area and moving to a different area of the system. The way this will be accomplished on our systems will be by deenergizing the entire substation and not just picking and choosing among individual members. The outage should last no longer than an hour and then the substation will be re-energized and another substation in the system will be turned off.

Why is it happening?

Unfortunately, there is no simple answer for this situation other than an extreme amount of cold weather affecting a large region of the country at one time. One more thing to keep in mind is that the electrical grid is very complex and involves many parts and the aforementioned cold weather is affecting multiples of these parts at one time.

When?

As stated earlier there has been no directive to shed load at this time, so we are only providing this information to be proactive. Rest assured that if the plan has to be put into motion, we will post the notification here and, on our website, as soon as possible. We will do everything in our power to minimize the event to the best of our ability.

What can I do?

Please continue to be safe and save energy when possible. Thank you for your continued support. The employees (Team SEMO) of SEMO Electric Cooperative, M&A Electric Power Cooperative and Associated Electric Cooperative take pride in providing safe and reliable energy to you, the member. Together, with all of us doing our part, we will make it through this event just like we have in the past.

5 p.m. Beat the Peak! Thank you for helping as Team SEMO works to keep the lights on and the fiber flowing! Follow these tips to help beat the peak! • Turn thermostat down at least four degrees • Turn off nonessential electric appliances and lights • Turn electric water heaters off or set to 120 degrees • Use towels or blankets to block cold air entry points, particularly around doors and windows • Close curtains and blinds; insulate with plastic sheeting, cardboard or a blanket • Bundle up in the warmest room of the home with layers of clothing and blankets.

11 a.m. Beat the Peak! SEMO Electric members can implement several practices to reduce the amount of electricity used during extended artic temperatures to help us all beat the peak! Turn and keep thermostat down 2-3 degrees. Minimize the use of major appliances at the same time. Use space heaters sparingly. Seal around drafty doors and windows Change furnace filters. Turn down thermostats on electric water heaters. Turn off lights & unplug small appliances not in use.

Continue to be safe... NWS: A major winter storm will bring heavy snow, dangerously cold wind chills, and disruptions to travel and commerce through tonight. Avoid all unnecessary travel during this period. Continue to monitor the latest forecast for updates.

SEMO Electric members can implement several practices to reduce the amount of electricity used during extended artic temperatures.

  • Turn and keep thermostat down 2-3 degrees.
  • Minimize the use of major appliances at the same time.
  • Use space heaters sparingly.
  • Seal around drafty doors and windows
  • Change furnace filters.
  • Turn down thermostats on electric water heaters.
  • Turn off lights & unplug small appliances not in use.

Feb 15